Last edited by Jurisar
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

6 edition of Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically found in the catalog.

Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically

by May Lansfield Keller

  • 178 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by C. Winter in Heidelberg .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Weapons -- England -- Terminology,
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby May Lansfield Keller.
    GenreTerminology., Glossaries, vocabularies, etc.
    SeriesAnglistische Forschungen -- Hft. 15
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPE25 .A5
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 275, [1] p.
    Number of Pages275
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23277241M
    LC Control Number06019102
    OCLC/WorldCa4017973

      It is very hard to know, because no one wrote down Anglo-Saxon myths directly, or copied and preserved much poetry about the Anglo-Saxon gods. In Iceland, for various reasons, people like Snorri Sturluson were willing to write down what they knew. Anglo-Saxon art covers art produced within the Anglo-Saxon period of English history, beginning with the Migration period style that the Anglo-Saxons brought with them from the continent in the 5th century, and ending in with the Norman Conquest of a large Anglo-Saxon nation-state whose sophisticated art was influential in much of northern Europe.

      On my intellectual journey into the dark, murky realms of the demonic, evil spirits and fallen angels have not been the only supernatural beings that I've had the pleasure of meeting. The cosmology of the Anglo-Saxons was rife with creatures and beings lurking in the shadows at the fringes of human habitation - as you. Anglo-Saxon definition: 1. used to refer to the people who lived in England from about AD and their language and. Learn more.

    This inclusive book by Hilda Ellis Davidson covers a large range of data on the development of the sword during this transition period in English history. Using both archaeological as well as literary references, it is explores the significance of the sword as a symbol and a weapon. Soft cover. /4" x /4". pages. Black & white Brand: Sold Out. Anglo-Saxon helmets often featured decorations resembling boars made of gold and bronze. The golden boar was an especially potent symbol of divine power, for the boar was an animal dear to the sun god Frey, and gold answered to his magic. Such decorations adorned not only ceremonial arms, but practical war tools as well.


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Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically by May Lansfield Keller Download PDF EPUB FB2

Full text of "The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically" See other formats. Excerpt from The Anglo-Saxon Weapon Names Treated Archæologically and Etymologically The compiler also avails herself of this opportunity to express her thanks and feeling of profound indebtedness to Professor Johannes H00ps, of the University of Heidel berg, for his ever ready suggestion and aid in the plan ning and execution of the work.-owing to the necessity of having all Cited by: 4.

: The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically eBook: Keller, May Lansfield: Kindle StorePrice: $ Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically.

Heidelberg, C. Winter, (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: May Lansfield Keller. Helen will be deeply missed by Anglo-Saxon scholars, students, and her friends all over the world.

If you would like to make a donation in her name, her sister has requested that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Institute for Medieval Studies at the University of New Mexico that she created and so lovingly shepherded for so long.

Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically. Heidelberg, C. Winter, (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: May Lansfield Keller. Further reading. Keller, May Lansfield (), The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically, Heidelberg: C.

Winter. Turnbull, Pauline (), May Lansfield Keller, life and letters,McClure Press. "May Lansfield Keller (–)", Find a Grave MemorialAlma mater: Heidelberg University. An atgeir, sometimes called a "mail-piercer" or "hewing-spear," was a type of polearm in use in Viking Age Scandinavia and Norse colonies in the British Isles and is usually translated in English as "halberd", but most likely closer resembled a bill or glaive during the Viking age.[citation needed] Another view is that the term had no association with a specific weapon until it is.

^ A monographic treatment of the question can be found in May Lansfield Keller, The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically ().

The most common Anglo-Saxon weapon was a spear, the most feared weapon was a battle-ax, and the most precious was a sword. It took hours for a blacksmith to craft an iron sword into shape. For close combat, Anglo-Saxon warriors used a type of knife, called a scramasax. History › Anglo-Saxons › Anglo-Saxon weapons ›.

The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically by M. Keller () The armies of industry; our nation's manufacture of munitions for a Seller Rating: % positive.

The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically, (Heidelberg: C. Winter, ), by May Lansfield Keller (page images at HathiTrust; US access only) The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archaeologically and etymologically.

(Heidelberg, Winter, ), by May Lansfield Keller (page images at HathiTrust; US access only). Keller, May Lansfield, The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically, Heidelberg: C.

Winter. Turnbull, May Lansfield Keller and letters,McClure Press. "May Lansfield Keller", Find a Grave Memorial, retrieved To read this book online, your options are Join Forgotten Books 1, books Unlimited reading Dedicated support Small monthly fee Click here to learn more.

The most common Anglo-Saxon weapon was a spear, the most feared weapon was a battle-axe, and the most precious was a sword. It took hours for a blacksmith to craft an iron sword into shape. For close combat, Anglo-Saxon warriors used a type of knife, called a scramasax.

History › Anglo-Saxons › Anglo-Saxon weapons ›. The Anglo-Saxon version of the story of Apollonius of Tyre by B. Thorpe () The Anglo-Saxon weapon names treated archæologically and etymologically by M. Keller () The Anglo-Saxon, a study in evolution by G. Boxall () The antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church by J.

Lingard (). The Anglo-Saxon Weapon Names Treated Archæologically and Etymologically by May Lansfield Keller Vol. 1 Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of London Novemto J by Society of Antiquaries of London.

Anglo-Saxon swords had straight, double-edged blades, averaging about 33″ long. The blades tapered but slightly and had somewhat rounded points – a weapon used for hacking and slicing, not piercing.

A shallow indentation, the fuller, ran along the centre of the blade upon both sides and served to lighten the weight of the weapon. The period of Anglo-Saxon warfare spans the 5th Century AD to the 11th in technology and tactics resemble those of other European cultural areas of the Early Middle Ages, although the Anglo-Saxons, unlike the Continental Germanic tribes such as the Franks and the Goths, do not appear to have regularly fought on horseback.

Anglo-Saxon weaponry War was a way of life to the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes who invaded and settled in Britain. They were fleeing the encroaching Romans, and the Germanic tribes in turn encroached on the remnants of the Empire in Britain.

Pollington describes the sword as "the most symbolically important weapon" of the Anglo-Saxon period, while historian Guy Halsall referred to it as "the most treasured item of early medieval military equipment". In the Old English language, sword was rendered as sweord, although other terms used for such weapons included heoru or heru, bill or bile, and mēce or mǣce.Anglo-Saxon Weapons and Armour.

This was a 'heroic' age: the surviving stories and poems make this clear. The greatest virtue was loyalty to one's lord: the warrior shared the spoils of battle, but he was also willing to die for his lord - indeed it was considered a disgrace to .Arms & Armour [5] - Swords.

Two early Anglo-Saxon sword hilts. The most prized and lauded weapon, but not the most common one, was the sword. These were very valuable and were often handed down from generation to generation, or were received or given as gifts by great warriors and kings.

In early Anglo-Saxon times the sword (such as the.