Last edited by Zulum
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

6 edition of Islam and Civil Society in Southeast Asia (Social Issues in Southeast Asia) found in the catalog.

Islam and Civil Society in Southeast Asia (Social Issues in Southeast Asia)

by Sharon Siddique

  • 9 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Institute of Southeast Asian Studies,Singapore .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Asian studies,
  • Islam,
  • Islamic studies,
  • South East Asia,
  • Social Science,
  • Sociology

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages228
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9195871M
    ISBN 109812301127
    ISBN 109789812301123

    Tan Ta Sen has modestly suggested that, as a book to illustrate the peaceful impact of culture contact, he is concerned to show how such cultural influences not only led to transmissions, conversions and transferences involving Inner Asian Muslims from China and Yunnan Muslims, Chams, Javanese, Malays, Arabs and Indians, but also enabled many Chinese in the Malay world to retain their non 5/5(1). Islam and Politics in Southeast Asia represents the culmination of a project entitled "Political and Civil Islam in Southeast Asia" funded by the Tokyo-based TODA Institute for Global Peace and Author: Ahmad Fauzi Abdul Hamid.

    By the fourteenth century the Islamic faith had spread via maritime trade routes to Southeast Asia where, over the next seven hundred years, it would have a continuing influence on political life, social customs, and the development of the arts. Sultans, Shamans, and Saints looks at Islam in Southeast Asia during four major eras: its arrival (to ), the first flowering of Islamic identity. Financial crisis hits Southeast Asia, leading to protests and social unrest in many countries of the region. President Suharto steps down in May in favor of B.J. Habibie amid widespread rioting, ending over thirty years of authoritarian rule.

    His latest book, Forging Peace in Southeast Asia: Insurgencies, Peace Processes, and Reconciliation, is a comparative analysis of the peace processes in Aceh, Mindanao and southern Thailand (). He authored the Southeast Asian chapter in the acclaimed, study Leaving Terrorism Behind.   Islam in Southeast Asia. Often called the “Muslim archipelago,” Southeast Asia is home to more than million Muslims -- about 42 percent of Southeast Asians, and about 25 percent of the world’s billion Muslims. Most Southeast Asian Muslims are Sunni, and follow the Shafii school of Muslim jurisprudence. Islam is the official Author: Ali Houissa.


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Islam and Civil Society in Southeast Asia (Social Issues in Southeast Asia) by Sharon Siddique Download PDF EPUB FB2

Read this book on Questia. This volume is the result Islam and Civil Society in Southeast Asia book a two-day closed intensive seminar and a halfday open symposium entitled “Islam and Civil Society: Messages from Southeast Asia”, held on 5–7 November in Japan, sponsored by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation.

In Novemberthe Sasakawa Peace Foundation invited ten Muslim activists and scholars from the region to Japan for exchanging views and experiences among themselves and with Japanese participants.

Here their papers and discussions are compiled into a book Cited by: In Novemberthe Sasakawa Peace Foundation invited ten Muslim activists and scholars from the region to Japan for exchanging views and experiences among themselves and with Japanese participants.

Here their papers and discussions are compiled into a book. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xv, pages ; 23 cm: Contents: Introduction / Nakamura Mitsuo --The Indonesian experience: civil society versus the tul Ulama and civil society in Indonesia / Mohammad Fajrul Falaakh --Muhammadiyah's experience in promoting civil society on the eve of the 21st century.

prospects for Islam and civil society in Southeast Asia. ISLAM AND MUSLIM SOCIETY IN SOUTHEAST ASIA On account of a range of historical, geographical, social, educational, intellectual, cultural, demographic, economic, and political reasons, Islam has occupied a very special place in Southeast Asia for a long time.

Historically, Islam has Cited by: This is evident from the fact that many Southeast Asian citizens are inspired by the civil society concept and now engage in public discourse and participation.

The experience of civil society in Southeast Asia shows that its impact -- or lack of impact -- on democratization and democracy depends on a variety of factors not only within civil. “Teaching Islam in Southeast Asia,” in Education About Asia, Vol.

10, No. 1 (Spring ): The entire Special Section About Islam in Asia in this issue would be useful for educators, and the thrice yearly publication itself is an invaluable resource for teaching and learning about Asia. This book looks at Islam and its strategic implications for Southeast Asia.

Part I outlines Islamic doctrine and traces the history and growth of Islamic economic institutions in the region. In Part II, politics, governance, civil society and gender issues are examined in the context of Southeast Asian : Hardcover.

Book Description. The Islamic community in Southeast Asia is widely regarded as one of the most moderate and tolerant in the Muslim world.

While most of the region’s Muslims are Sunni and fairly orthodox, the Islamic faith as practised in the region has historically been a syncretic blend of Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and folk religions. The book looks at the ideological and doctrinal content of Islam in Southeast Asia in all its facets, while also exploring the motivations underlying different interpretations and viewpoints.

This is an essential book for anyone seeking to understand the concerns, language and objectives of the main Muslim groups in Southeast Asia.5/5(1). Hefner is to be congratulated on his tremendous contributions to the literature on Indonesia and Southeast Asia generally, as well as his deep insights on-and furthering of-myriad debates on politics, religion, civil society, and modernity."—Michael G.

Peletz, Colgate University. The time frame for conversion to Islam in Southeast Asia is also uncertain. Although archeological remnants, such as tombs, exist from earlier periods, Islam only becomes more obviously prevalent in Southeast Asia after the 13th century, when it becomes an integral factor in the emergence of new kingdoms or sultanates founded along the.

Islam and Civil Society in Southeast Asia By Nakamura Mitsuo; Sharon Siddique; Omar Farouk Bajunid Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Read preview Overview Asian Islam in the 21st Century By John L.

Esposito; John O. Voll; Osman Bakar Oxford University Press,   The Pew Forum interviewed Anwar following a roundtable on Islam in Southeast Asia co-sponsored by the Forum and the Council on Foreign Relations.

He discussed the relationship between Islam and the West, the prospects for democratic transition in the Muslim world and the implications for U.S. foreign policy. Defending community, strengthening civil society.

A Muslim minority's contribution to Thai civil society. In Islam and civil society in Southeast Asia, edited by Mitsuo Nakamura, Sharon Siddique, et al., Singapore: ISEAS. Google ScholarCited by: occurred in Southeast Asia since the s belong to this category. An example of the social studies approach is the study of Taufik Abdullah and Sharon Siddique on Islam and society in Southeast Asia.

Finally, a fourth group of Islamic studies is concerned with the political econ-omy of Southeast Asia. Ellen, Roy F. Practical Islam in South-East Asia.

In Islam in South-East Asia, edited by M. Hooker. Netherlands: Brill. Houben, Vincent J. Southeast Asia and Islam. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science Islam, Syed Serajul. The Politics of Islamic Identity in Southeast Asia.

"The book under review offers a rare discussion of theoretical and empirical thinking about Islamic engagements with, variously, state power, 'authoritarian democracy' and civil society challenges, set against highly pluralistic societies that make up Southeast Asia.

Islam & civil society in Southeast Asia / edited by Nakamura Mitsuo, Sharon Siddique, Omar Farouk Bajunid Institute of Southeast Asian Studies Singapore Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required.

Drawing from detailed case studies across the Middle East and Southeast Asia, the book engages with broader theoretical questions about political change in the context of socio-economic transformations and presents an innovative, comparative framework to shed new light on the diverse trajectories of Islamic politics in the modern world.

Islam & civil society in Southeast Asia / edited by Nakamura Mitsuo, Sharon Siddique, Omar Farouk Bajunid. This volume is the result of a two-day closed intensive seminar and a half-day open symposium entitled "Islam and Civil Society: Messages from Southeast Asia", held in in Japan.View Islam in the Southeast Asia Research Papers on for free.In the Indonesian Nahdlatul Ulama, Southeast Asia houses the largest Islamic civil society organization in the world.

Established in and claiming a membership of 40 million today, Nahdlatul Ulama is a traditionalist Muslim organization which supports the principles of pluralism and democracy in Indonesia.